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Intermittent Fasting: Your Silver Bullet for Improved Health and Increased Weight Loss?

One of the nice things about the aging process is that the older you get, the less you tend to want to eat. When we’re all younger, we typically eat more – a lot more – and don’t have much regard for what we’re ingesting, either. If it happens to be healthy, fine, but we don’t usually go out of our way to make sure that it is. If it’s delicious, we devoured it.

Thankfully, that changes as we age.

Something else that comes into play, as we get older, is that we’re more in tune to how what we eat, and how much of it we consume, affects not just our weight, but our health.

One of the diet-based methods of dropping pounds and improving health that’s gaining real traction nowadays is something called intermittent fasting (IF). With intermittent fasting, known by some as “strategic starvation,” you adopt a pattern of eating in intervals, wherein you rotate between periods of eating and fasting, but do neither for significantly extended periods.

Should we be Intermittent Fasting

  • The benefits of IF, in addition to weight loss, can include:
  • Preventing resistance to insulin.
  • Improving cardiovascular health.
  • Boosting human growth hormone (HGH).
  • Reducing inflammation.
  • Improving the health of your “gut.”

Additionally, this article over at CNN.com touts the potential, significant health benefits of fasting that go above and beyond “mere” weight loss.

If any – or all – of this sounds intriguing to you, and you’re thinking you’d like to give IF a try, you might want to consider invoking the help of a comprehensive, step-by-step guide that drills down to the important details and tells you everything you need to know in order to properly embark on an intermittent fasting regimen: Eat Stop Eat.

With Eat Stop Eat, you will be exposed to the “A to Z” of intermittent fasting. The topics covered are both plentiful and wide in scope, and include:

  • Fasting and Your Metabolism
  • Fasting and Hunger
  • Misconceptions about Fasting
  • Health Benefits of Fasting
  • The Eat Stop Eat Way of Life
  • How to Fast Eat Stop Eat Style
  • What to Do While Fasting

And this is just a small sample of the information to be found in Eat Stop Eat.

Another benefit that’s almost as good as access to the information itself…is what it costs. Right now, the complete Eat Stop Eat program, including the bonus Eat Stop Eat Quick Start Guide, is yours for just $10.

What’s more, Eat Stop Eat comes with a 60-day money-back guarantee. Go crazy with the information, and if you decide within the first two months after purchase that it’s just not for you, you can get your money back.
How great is that?

In the end, losing weight and improving health will typically be at, or close to, the top of just about everyone’s list of ongoing priorities. Different programs and disciplines work better for different people. Fasting is just one of those options, but a growing body of research is affirming the complete benefits of that particular strategy for so many. To learn more about the Eat Stop Eat program or to purchase it straight away, Click Here.

(Note: Before embarking on a fasting diet, you should always consult with a qualified health professional. Those who suffer from hypoglycemia or diabetes, or who are pregnant or breastfeeding, will typically be poor candidates for a fasting diet. Even if you believe to have none of these conditions and think yourself to be in excellent health, you should always consult a physician or other appropriate medical professional before proceeding with an actual fasting diet.)

By Robert G. Yetman, Jr. Editor At Large 

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