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The Peculiar Priorities of Sweden’s Military

Militaries everywhere seem to be changing a LOT.

You know about the ongoing battle in this country about what, if any, role that so-called transgenders should be allowed to formally play in the defense of the nation.

Well, in countries well known to be even more progressive than the United States, it seems the incorporation of social justice agendas is becoming an official component of their very mission.

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Take Sweden. As reported by a variety of news outlets, including the International Business Times, the official Facebook page of Sweden’s army made last Monday what many saw as a curious update to what is ostensibly its mission as an official branch of the military. Here it is:

“We are prepared to go as far as we can.

Your right to live any way you want, as whoever you want and with whom you want, is our task to defend. And we are prepared to give everything to do it. Learn more about how we work for everyone's equal value, justice and equality at http://www.forsvarsmakten.se.”

Sweden’s army sees its “task to defend” as the “right to live any way you want, as whoever you want and with whom you want?”

As you might imagine, even in progressive Sweden, a post like this from the nation’s army is sparking quite a backlash.

One Facebook user asked, “Are you so lost in the rainbow mist that you’ve forgotten you’re supposed to be warriors?” Another poster, identified as Johan Walterström, inquired as to “why the armed forces are spending money on various marketing activities that are in no way making us more dangerous to our enemies.

“Because that should always be the main task. There are other bodies which have the job of disseminating information to influence people’s thoughts,” he wrote.

A military that chooses as its focus the task of making itself more dangerous to its enemies?

What a novel concept, apparently, in 2017.

By Robert G. Yetman, Jr. Editor At Large

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