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Polish Official Says His Country Accepting Migrants Would “Be Worse” than EU Sanctions

Not mincing words, Poland’s Minister of the Interior, Mariusz Błaszczak, said pointedly on radio recently that giving in to European Union quotas in accepting more migrants would “certainly be worse” than whatever sanctions or other punishments the EU might administer against his country.

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Back in 2015, EU leaders had agreed that member states would accept asylum-seekers over the course of the subsequent two years in order to help bring relief to Greece and Italy – the governing body is seeking to relocate throughout the rest of the EU up to 160,000 refugees from those two nations.

According to Express, if Poland elects not to play ball with the European Union, the country could face not only sanctions, but ultimately find itself stripped of voting rights.

Poland’s leadership, however, seems much more concerned about what could happen if it does accept migrants than it is about what might occur if it doesn’t.

“Let u keep in mind what happened in Western Europe,” said Blaszczak. “Let us remember the terrorist attacks, which are a fact in the larger states of the European Union, unfortunately.”

Blaszczak’s comments keep him in lockstep with the current position of his country’s prime minister, Beata Szydlo, on the subject of refugees and the EU. Szydlo has flatly refused to accept any refugees, and said back in March, in the wake of the deadly London terror attack that saw a radical Islamist drive a car into a group of pedestrians, that it was the EU’s very policy on migration that was to blame for the incident.

Speaking to reporters in Warsaw, Szydlo declared that “there is no chance that refugees could be received in Poland at the moment and we certainly will not accept the imposition on Poland or other member states of any kind of mandatory quotas.”

By Robert G. Yetman, Jr. Editor At Large

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