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Columnist: Democrats on Verge of Becoming ‘Permanent Minority’ Party

 Stewart Lawrence, writing over at The Daily Caller, suggests the Democratic Party is quickly becoming so marginalized that it may well become the “permanent minority” party it had once arrogantly claimed the GOP would be in just a relative handful of years.

Democrats May Be On The Verge Of Becoming A  Permanent Minority  Party   The Daily Caller

Lawrence reminds readers of the Democrats’ theory to that effect…that the Republican Party had become so irrelevant to basically every demographic besides white men in flyover country, that there was no way they’d be in charge of anything ever again.

Uh-huh.

Now, an aggressive, “America first” Republican president is in charge of the country, accompanied on his political adventures by a Congress that is fully in Republican control.

What’s more, the Republican president stayed true to his word and recently nominated to the Supreme Court a jurist whose values are largely reflective of the base that voted said president into office.

Who, again, is at serious risk of becoming the “permanent minority” party?

In making his case, Lawrence, in part, cites an analysis recently conducted by think tank Third Way that illustrates how Democrats are becoming the very “coastal” party critics have accused them of being for some time now.

Lawrence offers up Third Way’s data showing that voters in California, New York, and Massachusetts went for Hillary Clinton by a substantial margin of 65% to 35%,while the voters that comprise the other 47 states, as a whole, went for Trump by a margin of 52% to 48%.

Moreover, Lawrence points out, the November defeat has left the Democratic Party bitterly divided and dealing with “fierce ideological, gender and ethnic divisions” that seem practically unresolvable for the foreseeable future.

By Robert G. Yetman, Jr.

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