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California Says It Will Continue to BE California, Will Fight Trump Every Step of the Way

California has no intention of being anything BUT California in the era of Trump.

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According to The Hill, the political elite of the state expect to dig in for a long fight with the new president and his administration on a variety of issues, most notably immigration. Hispanics make up roughly 40 percent of California’s population, which means that Trump’s anticipated efforts to curb illegal immigration may well see California a regular topic of discussion nationally over the course of the next four years.

Hillary Clinton captured nearly 62 percent of the vote in California, which translated to well over four million votes more than the number received by the President-elect. Additionally, a large number of California’s most prominent politicians are renowned liberals, including Gov. Jerry Brown, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, as well as Senator-elect Kamala Harris, who is leaving her position as Attorney General to go to Washington.

In speaking with The Hill, Xavier Becerra, who will succeed Harris as the state’s new AG, said, “My sense is we’re not going to stop being California. We’ve got a very progressive group of leaders from Governor Brown, to our state legislative leaders [State Assembly Speaker] Anthony Rendon, to [State Senate President] Kevin de Leon.”

California has no shortage of mayors who’ve gone on the record to say they will fight any attempts by the new administration to crack down on undocumented immigrants, and that their municipalities will remain sanctuary cities. This includes Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, who unveiled a “legal aid fund” this past Monday that would be used to fight deportations.

Immigration is but one issue over which the incoming administration and California’s leaders will be at odds. As The Hill points out, the state and the federal government will likely disagree on just about every meaningful political topic, which means that the two biggest bureaucracies in the country will remain faced-off against one another for the duration of Trump’s term.

By Robert G. Yetman, Jr. Editor At Large

 

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