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Your Bad Credit Can Cost You a Lot More Than a Good Loan Rate

Most tend to think of the problems with having poor credit in terms of the higher interest rates charged, or even the inability to be approved at all for a home or auto loan. As you may have heard, many employers nowadays make a review of your credit a standard feature of the screening process, as credit history has come to be seen - fairly or unfairly - as a measure of your personal integrity. This means that your checkered history can not only stand in the way between you and a competitive, money-saving interest rate, or approval to buy a “big ticket” item on credit…but it can potentially stop you entirely in your tracks when it comes to meaningful career advancement.

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While you might expect that having poor personal credit could be an impediment to getting hired in a finance-related position, credit evaluations of job applicants are being increasingly used by businesses to try to ferret out any hidden land mines that may be plaguing that person who otherwise looks great on a resume and interviews very well. Beyond the financial management implications of having bad credit, many companies have decided that your credit history is a reasonable measure of the level of your personal responsibility. Other companies often see personal problems reflected in bad credit, problems that may be difficult for a new hire to keep from finding their way into his daily work life. The bottom line is that as important as good credit is to accessing key loans…loans needed to buy expensive appliances and furniture, cars, even a home…it is now important, as well, to landing a good job.

On that note, I want to mention what I believe is a straightforward, easy-to-use, comprehensive online membership program designed to help those who are “credit challenged” to remedy ALL of their credit-related problems, called What Lies In Your Debt?

Jumping out as perhaps the biggest difference between What Lies In Your Debt? and other programs on credit repair and management is the comprehensiveness of the information and resources.

For starters, there’s a ton of information on how to:

  • Fix credit reports
  • Stop collection calls
  • Stop foreclosure
  • Stop debt collectors in their tracks
  • And a LOT more.

It is not simply information, however. Again, this is a comprehensive membership site, complete with:

  • Weekly webinars and calls
  • Members forum
  • Video tutorials
  • Extensive Downloads
  • Legal Lounge
  • There’s even more, however...much more…

You see, this program is not simply about fixing your credit and debt collection troubles, as great as that is. This is not just another credit repair service, as terrific as THAT is. In addition to all of the information provided on debt collection and credit repair, there is also a great deal of information on how to go about receiving financial compensation when creditors and debt collectors break the law in their efforts to collect from you or from the mismanagement of your file. From the program’s directors:

We have over 40 years combined experience with foreclosure, credit card debt, Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) violations, Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) violations, Telephone Consumer Practice Act (TCPA) violations, Truth In Lending Act (TILA) violations, and Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA) violations. We have a proven track record of collecting from the banks and debt collectors and making them PAY for breaking the law!

Still not sure if this is for you? What if there was a risk-free component to joining What Lies In Your Debt?

Well, there is. After signing up, you have 60 days to utilize this veritable treasure trove of information and resources, and, if you decide by that time that it is not for you, you can get all of your money back. How great is that?

To learn more about the What Lies In Your Debt? Click Here.

By Robert G. Yetman, Jr. Editor At Large

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