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Leading Political Strategist Says Trump-Clinton Battle May Permanently Change U.S. Politics

We’ve been hearing for some time that as this year’s election is like nothing that has come before it, at least in the modern era, there is likely to be a great deal of lasting fallout, regardless of which major-party candidate prevails. The infighting within each of the parties over this year’s nominees has been loud and very contentious, and some have gone on the record with their opinion that the resulting damage from this year’s wrestling matches will wreak permanent change on both parties.

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In fact, one person, Greg Valliere, chief political strategist at Horizon Investments, suggested in a speech reported by Investment News and delivered Monday night that the damage will likely prove to be so bad that 2016 may well prove to be the last year of the two-party system as we know it, and that such will be a direct result of electing…regardless of who wins on November 8… the “least popular president ever.”

Valliere strongly believes that what we have now will be replaced by a system comprised of four political parties that are roughly equal to one another in weight and stature. As he put it on Monday:

“The friction is there for two more political parties, and by the next presidential election you literally could have four legitimate parties emerging. Things aren't going to calm down after the election; I think we could see even more division as we move into 2020.”

I’m hearing this more and more myself. While there was a time you knew that talk of such a breakaway move would never result in meaningful action, things are, admittedly a little different here in the Internet age, wherein the maturity and increasing dominance of the so-called “new media” means that people on both sides of the political dividing line have an important tool by which to engage in compelling national political dialogues outside of the purview of the mainstream media.

The bottom line is that it is easier than ever before to energize and organize party dissidents, and Valliere is just the latest high-profile voice to say that many of these folks will act together, going forward, to forever change the American political landscape.

By Robert G. Yetman, Jr. Editor At Large

 

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