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For all of the mixed reviews Donald Trump’s Monday night debate performance received, none of them seemed to diminish any of the enthusiasm of his supporters when he showed up in Florida on Tuesday for what turned out to be a rousing campaign rally.

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The day after the showdown with Hillary Clinton, while she was largely “missing in action,” Trump was right back on the campaign trail, moving full steam ahead in his effort to win the White House. His first major appearance after the debate was at an event in Central Florida, where many thousands filled an aircraft hangar in the “Space Coast” city of Melbourne to capacity to hear him speak; thousands more were turned away when the fire marshal cut off any further entrance out of deference to safety concerns.

One of Trump’s central themes at Tuesday’s rally was jobs. East Central Florida as seen a lot of companies oriented on the defense and technology industries gravitate to the area through the decades, but the uncertain future of America’s space program has generated a fair number of layoffs over the last several years. Although there remains a strong presence of companies throughout that part of Florida, employment will remain a distinct concern for the foreseeable future. Taking his cue, Trump called out Hillary on jobs during his speech, saying, “She pledged 200,000 jobs for upstate New York. It's so sad when you see what has happened to upstate New York. It's a disaster. She said she was going to do something about it... This is exactly what would happen if she ever won.”

Trump also used the opportunity to revisit the previous night’s debate performances, declaring, “For 90 minutes, Secretary Clinton was stuck in the past. For 90 minutes, on issue after issue, Secretary Clinton defended the terrible status quo – while I laid out our plan to bring jobs, security and prosperity back to the American people.”

Many observers noted that Trump’s rhetoric at this rally was back to being rather feisty, compared to the tone he adopted just the night before at the debate. It is believed that, going forward, he will have to be more like the “rally” Donald at subsequent debates in order to prompt any undecided voters to think twice about casting their votes for Clinton in November.

By Robert G. Yetman, Jr. Editor At Large

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