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The Obamacare “Perfect Storm” Continues to Churn - Choice Among Insurers Rapidly Disappearing

The Obamacare dream is becoming, before our very eyes, the nightmare that many financial minds said it even before things got off the ground.

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CNBC.com is reporting at it site on the findings of an analysis done by healthcare consulting firm Avalere, findings that reveal roughly a third of the United States will have no choice of insurer when it comes time for 2017 enrollment; residents of Alaska, Alabama, Kansas, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Wyoming are expected to have just one option, while over half the country, around 55 percent, overall, will have two or fewer options. As a matter of fact, according to Avalere, it may well be the case that “some sub-region counties” may see no plan availability whatsoever.

What happened to all of those competition-driven, low-cost choices we were supposed to have?

What is coming to pass is what lots of knowledgeable folks said would happen when the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was rolled out. The program’s proponents, President Obama chief among them, bragged that insurers can’t deny coverage or charge more for people with pre-existing conditions. Insurance, as a concept, as well as an industry, simply cannot work that way for very long, but it’s a great thing to tell the low-information voters to which Democrats typically pander. Unfortunately, it is those same low-information…and, oftentimes, low income…voters who are about to find themselves left behind in the Obamacare dust. The enormous costs associated with guaranteeing health care for everyone continues to drive up policy costs annually, and now, with giant insurers like UnitedHealth, Aetna, and Humana exiting the exchanges in many places around the country, those costs will rise further still.

As for those counties where Obamacare may not be available at all, off-exchange insurance plans would still be available, but none of those come with the financial subsidies that have made ACA-based health insurance affordable…and, therefore, accessible…to families making less money.

By Robert G. Yetman, Jr. Editor At Large

 

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