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Yes, Even the “Little Guy” Can Be a Bona Fide Gun Dealer

By Robert G. Yetman, Jr. Editor At Large

 We talk a lot about the importance of developing multiple streams of income, in this day and age. The economic infrastructure of the United States has changed in such a way that there has become an emerging class of worker who is not entirely full-time, and not entirely part-time. These people have found themselves generating income on the basis of a “patchwork” approach to working. A number of factors beyond their control have conspired to create this situation; among them are substantial constraints now placed by the federal government on businesses, including onerous health insurance requirements, that now prompt many small- to medium-sized businesses (the ones that employ most of us) to employ fewer full-time people. In the face of all of this, you have to make do, somehow.

For those of you who are more conservative-minded, you likely already have a real interest in firearms. Have ever considered the possibility of getting involved, part-time, in the gun business…spending more time in a realm you enjoy while also further insulating yourself from financial uncertainty? Becoming a federally-licensed firearms dealer is one of the easiest ways to do it. Having a FFL opens up a new world to you as a small business person; as a matter of fact, not only do you then have the ability to actually sell guns yourself, but you can make decent money simply processing transfers of firearms.

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What is a gun transfer?

There are plenty of online stores from which guns can be purchased. However, the store cannot ship the gun directly to you on the basis of an online purchase; it has to be shipped to a FFL in your area. From there, all of the required processing is done, and you then take your gun home when it is completed. The FFL handling the transfer charges a fee, of course, for that service. $50 is very common. What’s important to note here is that a lot of larger outfits with FFLs don’t want to be bothered with transfers – they’re only interested in the guns they’re selling. Fair enough. However, that reality opens up an opportunity for you, as the “little guy.” And we’re just talking transfers here.

If you’re looking for a way to add more money to the family coffers, and you have an interest in firearms, you might do well to consider becoming a federally-licensed firearms dealer. It’s even a business that you can run from your home – no storefront required. With the average markup on guns running about 30 percent, becoming a home-based firearms dealer means you have a leg up on the local, storefront, retail competition because of your lower overhead. Processing just a few gun transactions in the lower-dollar range ($300 to $500, these days) could see you earn several hundred additional dollars per week, even while undercutting the competition.

If you are interested in picking up your FFL, it’s a good idea to get some solid guidance on completing the application – when applications are kicked back by the ATF, it’s typically because they’re incomplete or were otherwise filled out incorrectly. There’s no reason to make that mistake; for just a relative few dollars, you can grab this comprehensive course on establishing your own, home-based gun dealer business that includes, among so much other great stuff, step-by-step instructions on how to complete the government paperwork and other requirements that unnecessarily trip up so many. Bonus – the course comes with a 60-day money-back guarantee; so, if you decide, after tearing into the materials, that becoming a FFL is not for you, or you just have a change of heart, then you can get your money back, no questions asked. How great is that? To learn more, Click Here.

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